On this episode of Coffee with Gringos, listen in as we reminisce on our first meeting! We'll be using typical vocabulary and phrases for first introductions. When you get lost, refer to the transcript below. If you're unsure what a word or phrase means, check out the Key Vocabulary, Phrases, and Slang section below the transcript. Happy listening!


Listen to Episode 2 of "Coffee with Gringos" here or download on soundcloud.

Transcript

Paige: You’re listening to Episode 2 of Coffee with Gringos. I’m Paige Sutherland.

Mariah: And I’m Mariah Wika. Welcome back! Today we’re talking about one of the most important topics and a topic that a lot of you have probably already worked on in the past. And that’s introducing yourself and telling your story. But we want to make sure you know how to do it in a really natural, normal way. Now today, as you’re listening, listen for mixed tenses and key vocabulary and phrases, but if you ever get confused, don’t worry, because for every episode we make of Coffee with Gringos, we also make a guide to that episode that goes on our blog that includes vocabulary we used, phrases we used, and a transcript that you can follow along with.

Paige: Speaking of introductions, you’re probably wondering who we are. I mean, we’re hosting Coffee with Gringos, but who are we? So, today, we’re gonna go back in time so you can hear how we first met.

Mariah: Hey, I’m Mariah!

Paige: Hey, I’m Paige!

Mariah: Nice to meet you! Do you work for Dynamic too?

Paige: I do! Yeah, I just started two months ago.

Mariah: Very cool. Welcome! It’s good to have you.

Paige: Thanks! What about you? Have you been here long?

Mariah: More or less. I’ve been with Dynamic English for 9 months.

Paige: 9 months?!

Mariah: Yeah, I moved to Chile last September.

Paige: Wow!

Mariah: I know, time flies, right? And where are you from?

Paige: I’m from Boston. *with a strong Boston accent!

Mariah: Oh, there it is! There’s the accent!

Paige: Yes. What about you?

Mariah: I’m from Minnesota.

Paige: I’m not sensing an accent.

Mariah: It is pretty neutral, but I mean, depending on where you go in Minnesota, you’ll here: “Oh ja, dontcha know, I’m from Minnesota.” *with a strong Minnesotan accent

Paige: There it is, there it is. Okay. Yeah. I haven’t even asked yet… why Chile?

Mariah: I think that every single person that I meet here asks me: “why Chile?” It is the most common question.

Paige: Absolutely.

Mariah: Yeah, yeah, so I decided to quit my job in December 2016, and I traveled for three months. And, that was the first time I came to South America. It was the first time I came to Chile, and I just had an awesome experience here. I did the classic gringa circuit through Chile. I went to Torres del Paine and Patagonia. I went to Valparaiso, spent some time in Santiago. But, it was awesome, and when I had the opportunity to come teach here, I knew it was what I wanted to do.

Paige: Wow, that’s quite a story. You went on a vacation, and now you live and work here!

Mariah: Yeah, it’s crazy. What about you? Why Chile?

Paige: My story is not as glamorous. I actually had never been to South America before moving here. I knew I wanted to travel a bunch and quit my job in the US and just moved to Chile without visiting it once.

Mariah: That’s a huge risk!

Paige: Yeah! I think some would say crazy, but I love it. I love it so far. So, have you always been a teacher?

Mariah: No, no, I studied Marketing and Communication Studies, but I actually want to teach in the long-term. I want to teach in the future too. I love doing this, and I love working with people. Marketing and Communications is fun, it’s creative, but you spend so much time working at your computer. And I’m a people person! And working here with students all day just makes me really happy. So, how about you?

Paige: I am not a teacher by trade. I actually studied journalism!

Mariah: No way?!

Paige: Yeah, back in the US I was a radio reporter for five years. I guess you could say I taught some of the general public the news. But in a formal teaching setting now. But I’ve been doing it for two months here, and it’s been great. My students are amazing, and I learn more from them than they learn from me. So, no, it’s been great.

Mariah: Totally! I think that’s one of the coolest parts about the job is that I have students who work in agriculture and hospitality and pharmaceuticals and one of my students worked on a boat. And so I learn so much about my students through these different industries that they work in.

Paige: Absolutely, no, it’s quite an experience. Enough about work! What do you do besides teaching?

Mariah: Correct, I don’t teach 100% of the time. I really love the outdoors, and I mean, that’s an amazing part of Chile, right? There are mountains, and there’s the ocean, and so there are so many opportunities to explore. So I love to travel, I love to hike. And just, seeing as much as I can of the city and the country. I like cooking with friends and going to different restaurants, things like that. Speaking of restaurants, have you been to Barrio Italia yet?

Paige: No!

Mariah: There’s this awesome restaurant there that has fantastic Gin & Tonics, and I don’t know about you, but that’s something that I missed from the US when I first got here. We should totally go sometime!

Paige: Yeah, that sounds awesome! Do you have WhatsApp?

Mariah: Of course, of course. Let’s exchange numbers, and we’ll make a plan!

Paige: Perfect, that sounds great. It was so nice meeting you.

Mariah: It was nice to meet you too!

Paige: So that was how Mariah and I first met.

Mariah: A little bit awkward, right? But that’s normal for a first meeting.

Paige: That’s normal!

Mariah: So now that we’ve practiced introducing ourselves and telling our story, let’s take that out into the real world… what does it sound like when you move beyond a first meeting and you have a regular, casual conversation? So, next week, Coffee with Gringos is headed to the bar. Thanks for joining us, and we’ll talk to you soon!


Key Vocabulary, Phrases, and Slang

  • Topic (noun) - a subject that you talk about

    • Example: Today we’re talking about one of the most important topics and a topic that a lot of you have probably already worked on in the past.

  • To introduce (verb) - to say who you are when you meet somebody for the first time

    • Example: It's important to be friendly when you first introduce yourself.

  • To host (verb) - a person who talks to guests on a radio or television program

    • Example: We're hosting Coffee with Gringos.

  • To wonder (verb) - to feel curiosity

    • Example: You're probably wondering who we are.

  • Gonna (slang) - Going to

    • Example: Today, we're gonna go back in time.

  • To go back in time (phrase) - return to the past

    • Today, we’re gonna go back in time so you can hear how we first met.

  • Just - just has many meanings, but where it appears in this episode, it means very recently

    • Example: I just started working at Dynamic English two months ago.

  • Time flies (phrase) - Time moves very quickly!

    • I've already worked with Dynamic English for one year! Time flies.

  • To sense (verb) - to perceive or be aware of

    • Example: I'm not sensing an accent.

  • To quit (verb) - to stop doing an action or activity (frequently used when talk about leaving a job)

    • Example: I quit my job in December 2016.

  • A bunch - another way of saying a lot

    • Example: I knew I wanted to travel a bunch.

  • Risk (noun) - an action you take that may or may not be successful

    • Example: Paige took a huge risk when she moved to Chile without ever having visited the country.

  • Long-term (adjective) - occurring over a long period of time

    • Example: I studied marketing, but I actually want to teach in the long-term.

  • People-person (noun) - A person who really enjoys spending their time with other people

    • Example: I love teaching because I'm definitely a people-person!

  • By trade (idiom) - used to indicate somebody's job

    • Example: I am not a teacher by trade. I actually studied journalism!

  • Reporter (noun) - a person who gathers and reports news

    • Example: Paige worked as a reporter for a radio station in the United States.

  • To hike (verb) - to take a long walk for fun or for exercise

    • Example: Mariah loves nature, so she loves hiking in the mountains!

  • I don't know about you, but I... (phrase) - a phrase that you use when you're expressing an opinion, but you're not sure if the person you're talking to shares your opinion

    • Example: I don't know about you, but I definitely miss the Gin & Tonics from the US.

  • Awkward (adjective) - not graceful, a little uncomfortable

    • Example: Mariah and Paige's first conversation was a little bit awkward.

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